The Balance of Progress

I recently came across this thought:  “Are you the all-or-nothing type? Choose progress, not perfection. Don’t get bogged down with little details, but repeat to yourself that ‘almost perfect’ is good enough for progress!”

Well, I am a cross my t’s and dot my i’s kinda girl!  “Almost” isn’t a word I like too much… I naturally want to not start something or completely finish it.  Anything in between has a chance at being a recipe for disaster!  But, when I think about communication, especially with clients or customers, I think there is a balance to progress – called “flexibility”.

Entrepreneur and visionary for the online opinions site The Big Smoke, Alexandra Tselios was quoted saying this about flexibility:

“I am a huge believer in flexibility and allowing your work to permeate into your everyday life, so that all facets can complement one another better. People simply do not thrive in rigid and inflexible conditions.

Flexibility in the workplace has to be a give and take scenario between both parties, with clear communication, but most importantly, clear boundaries and expectations.

Flexibility may be around personal circumstances, outside activities or even education; but regardless, if there is no clarity surrounding how it will impact the business or the employee, then resentment can start to breed. In this case, flexibility, when not handled well by management risks becoming a double-edged sword.”

So, maybe the next time you are in process of creating new strategies, concepts or ideas, try crossing your i’s or dotting your t’s, figuratively speaking.  Watch what progress can come from the process of choosing progress vs perfection.  Flexibility vs comfortably.  Clearly communicate with your clients and/or customers within your boundaries and expectations. However, be sure to make the process “good enough” for you and a positive impact on the followers and potential followers with whom you are working to communicate.

Maybe you’ll find yourself a little more comfortable being the “or” of the all-or-nothing type!

Quote via Business Insider.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s