Focus Pocus

Whether at work or play, do you give yourself “emotional permission” to accomplish the things you really want to accomplish?  Do you give yourself permission to do the things you want to do?  (Those may be two different things.) Sometimes we spend so much time promoting and enabling our friends or clients, we neglect finding worth in the amount of things we accomplish.

So, how do we multiply our time to be productive in all areas of our life?

Focus.

We tend to focus one of two ways:

  1. We focus great when we are working, but on personal goals, tasks and interests, we tend to ignore or down-play the commitment needed to accomplish those things on a day-by-day basis; or,
  2. We spend time doing the things we love enjoy naturally accomplishing, only to leave tasks that take work, or work itself, until tomorrow.

How do we control our focus and bring balance to work and play?  It isn’t magic, it is simple:  we spend time on the things today that will result in more time tomorrow.*

“There is no such thing as time management, only self-management.”

Rory Vaden

This morning, I came across an email from Social Marketing Examiner.  This is a great tool!  If you aren’t already getting emails, you can get Social Media Content from them too!  In this particular newsletter, there was an article from Rory Vaden and I had to share the insights from his new book, Procrastinate On Purpose.  He says:

“In the world we live in today, time management isn’t just logical, it’s emotional.  Our feelings of guilt, fear, worry and anxiety, as well as our desire for success and our need to feel valued dictate how we spend our time.

The three factors work like this:

  • Importance is how much this matters.
  • Urgency is how soon this matters.
  • Significance is how long this is going to matter.

Multipliers don’t ask themselves, “What’s the most important thing I can do today?” If they do that, they start falling victim to urgency. Instead, they ask, “What can I do today that will create more results or opportunity tomorrow?”

While there is nothing you can do to create more time in one day, there are certain things you can do today to increase time tomorrow.

Without the significance calculation, Rory explains, we inappropriately overweight the urgency calculation. Therefore, we end up always doing things that are urgent. Multipliers have realized that success is no longer related to the volume of tasks we achieve, but rather their significance.”

[ Three types of procrastination ]

* Paraphrased quote from Rory Vaden.

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